News and Views

Tim Watts appointed as Executive Officer

New Executive Officer of the Western Australian Livestock Research Council (WALRC), Tim Watts. Image provided by MLA

Pingelly sheep producer and veterinarian Tim Watts has been appointed new Executive Officer of the Western Australian Livestock Research Council (WALRC), taking over the role from outgoing inaugural Executive Officer, Erin Gorter.

WALRC was established by Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA) in early 2015 to gather feedback on the research, development and adoption (RD&A) priorities of grassfed beef and sheep meat producers and stakeholders across southern WA. Northern WA producers from the Kimberley and Pilbara regions have input into RD&A priority-setting through the North Australia Beef Research Council (NABRC).

MLA General Manager – Producer Consultation and Adoption, Michael Crowley, said Tim’s appointment followed an extensive selection and appointment process.

“Tim has worked within the livestock industry as a veterinarian for more than 30 years, and has broad experience in the industry with a background in consulting and as a sheep producer,” Mr Crowley said.

“Tim has held a number of livestock industry business and strategic roles over his career to date, and has extensive experience in the research and extension field.

“MLA welcomes Tim to the role as WALRC Executive Officer, which is a pivotal and influential leadership role working with a wide cross-section of producer groups, RD&A agencies and industry representatives from Western Australia’s sheep meat and southern beef industries.

“WALRC, along with NABRC and the Southern Australia Meat Research Council (SAMRC) fulfil a critical role as overarching bodies to collect grassroots producer feedback to help set regional and national RD&A priorities.”

Mr Crowley said inaugural WALRC Coordinator, Erin Gorter, stood down from the position following the completion of her two-year tenure earlier in 2017.

“Erin has made an outstanding contribution to WALRC working tirelessly in spearheading its work consulting with producers about where their levies should be directed and advising on strategic requirements and operational priorities for RD&A activities in the region,” Mr Crowley said.

Tim said he was looking forward to starting in the role and continuing to progress the regional consultation process.

“WALRC exists because it has been recognised that we need a mechanism by which producers can have a direct say about what RD&A priorities their levies should be directed towards,” Tim said.

“The regional consultation process which WALRC helps facilitate is a fantastic way for producers to be able to express their views. I encourage producers to take advantage of the opportunity to get involved and have their say via the forum process or more informally when you see WALRC people out and about.”

Tim has been farming at Pingelly since 2000 and runs a commercial Merino flock including terminal lamb production with winter cropping.

He breeds his own rams utilising objective measurement and commercial classing traits.

Tim has also been consulting part-time to private farm businesses and the veterinary pharmaceutical industry since 2000.

Source: MLA

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