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Pacific Seeds donates hundreds of bags of seed for farmers in drought

Robyn Skillen and Michael Nott -members of Boggabri Rotary club with the seed at the Boggabri Pursehouse depot
Robyn Skillen and Michael Nott -members of Boggabri Rotary club with the seed at the Boggabri Pursehouse depot

Pacific Seeds has donated more than 1,600 bags of forage sorghum seed, enough to plant over 4000 ha.

The seed has been delivered to drought-stricken farmers in Queensland and northern New South Wales.

Pacific Seeds managing director Barry Croker said the donation represented a tangible way that they could help farmers through this difficult time.

“Farmers are proud and practical people. So, we wanted to provide them with practical aid,” said Mr Croker.

“We decided the best way Pacific Seeds could help was by donating seed to be used on farms for forage,” said Mr Croker.

“As a member of the agricultural community many ways were looked at on how we could help. Forage sorghum seed, though not an immediate fix was felt to be the most natural fit given the extreme shortage of fodder.

“The drought has taken a significant toll on farmers and their communities, the donation of 1,620 bags of seed is just a small gesture of in showing our support and appreciation.”

One of the distribution methods for the donation has been through the Rotary club of Boggarbri.

Boggabri Rotary president Malcolm Donaldson said the shipment from Pacific Seeds is so big they have been able to distribute to the neighbouring districts of Narrabri, Gunnedah West and Coonabarabran, where farmers are dealing with the drought.

“We distributed bags of hybrid forage seed amongst 120 farmers. These farmers were approached individually, and seed was targeted at those landholders who may have missed out on most forms of drought assistance.”

“At least half of the seed has already been planted just before a rain event which has been great for farmers.”

“In the Boggabri district the seed was limited to allow a maximum number of landholders to benefit from the donation, and plant a medium sized paddock to forage. Landholders generally had to have either a failed cereal or oats paddock or a fallowed paddock available for planting,” said Mr Donaldson.

“The donation is a bit like giving a farmer a fishing line, not a fish. Farmers are comfortable with this type of assistance. It is a practical donation and that can ultimately be used as feed.

“If you get a product like Pacific Seeds has offered you can get it in the ground and grow as carry over feed or you could make hay out of it. This is a practical aid solution.

“The drought has been character building for communities like Boggabri, but the aid from Pacific Seeds has been well received and is a welcome relief.”

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